Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Obsession du Jour

Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel
One of the key designers who made a bold and lasting impression on women's fashion in the twentieth century
Born in Saumur, in the Loire Valley of France, Chanel survived an impoverished childhood and strict convent education. The difficulties of her early life inspired her to pursue a radically different lifestyle, first on the stage, where she acquired the nickname "Coco," and then as a milliner.

With the help of one of the male admirers who would provide key financial assistance and social connections over the course of her career, Chanel opened her first shop in Paris in 1913, followed by another in the resort town of Deauville. Selling hats and a limited line of garments, Chanel's shops developed a dedicated clientele who quickly made her practical sportswear a great success. Much of Chanel's clothing was made of jersey, a choice of fabric both unusual and inspired. Until the designer began to work with it, jersey was more commonly used for men's underwear. With her financial situation precarious in the early years of her design career, Chanel purchased jersey primarily for its low cost. The qualities of the fabric, however, ensured that the designer would continue to use it long after her business became profitable. The fabric draped well and suited Chanel's designs, which were simple, practical, and often inspired by men's wear, especially the uniforms prevalent when World War I broke out in 1914.

Chanel's own lifestyle fueled her ideas of how modern women everywhere should look, act, and dress. Her own slim boyish figure and cropped hair became an ideal, as did her tanned skin, active lifestyle, and financial independence. Throughout her career, Chanel succeeded in packaging and marketing her own personal attitudes and style, making her a key arbiter of women's taste throughout the twentieth century.

Chanel continued to create successful looks for women through the 1920s and '30s. In 1926, American Vogue likened Chanel's "little black dress" to the Ford, alluding to its almost universal popularity as a fashion basic.

Despite her great success, Chanel closed the doors of her salon in 1939, when France declared war on Germany. Other couturiers left the country, but Chanel endured the war in Paris, her future uncertain. Following the end of the hostilities and resolution of some personal difficulties, Chanel found she could not idly stand by and observe the early success of Christian Dior, whose "New Look" prevailed in the postwar period. While many admired Dior's celebration of femininity, with full skirts and nipped-in waists, Chanel felt his designs were neither modern nor suitable for the liberated women who had survived another war by taking on active roles in society. Just as she had following World War I, Chanel set out to rescue and reinvigorate women's fashion.

The designer faced challenges in this endeavor: securing finances, assembling a new staff, seeking out new fabrics, competing at age seventy against a new generation of designers. Chanel's comeback collection of couture debuted in 1953 (1976.370.2a-c). Although it was not a critical success, the designer persevered. Within three seasons, Chanel was enjoying newfound respect. She updated her classic looks, reworking the classic tweed designs until wealthy women and celebrities returned to the showroom in droves. The Chanel suit became a status symbol for a new generation, made of solid or tweed fabric, with its slim skirt and collarless jacket trimmed in braid, gold buttons, patch pockets, and—sewn into the hem—a gold-colored chain ensuring it hung properly from the shoulders. Chanel also reintroduced her handbags, jewelry, and shoes with great success in subsequent seasons.

Following Chanel's death in 1971, several of her assistants designed the couture and ready-to-wear lines until Karl Lagerfeld (born 1938) took over the haute couture design in 1983 and ready-to-wear in 1984. Lagerfeld, like Chanel at the time of her comeback, looked to past designs for the secret to his success. His designs incorporated signature Chanel details, tweed fabrics, colors, gold chains, quilt-stitched leather, and the linked "CC" logo. In later collections, Lagerfeld became more irreverent, deconstructing some of the ladylike polish of Chanel's 1960s looks. Playing with the fact that Chanel's favorite jersey fabric had been used for men's underwear at the turn of the twentieth century, Lagerfeld even incorporated men's T-shirts and briefs into his designs (1993.104.2a-c). Nonetheless, Lagerfeld's ability to continuously mine the Chanel archive for inspiration testifies to the importance of Gabrielle Chanel's contributions to women's fashion in the twentieth century.

 Circa 1935-1937 

Circa 1964

Theater Suit 1938

Evening Ensemble 1936

Circa 1926-1927



"Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening." Coco Chanel 

Text: Jessa Krick - The Costume Institute, The Metropolitan Museum of Art 
Video: Vogue

10 comments:

  1. Great post, love her!

    I'm doing a Tatty Devine giveaway on my blog at the moment, if you fancy it!

    tweet tweet tweet

    x

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  2. that striped jacket! could anything be more timeless? holy F.

    i could kick myself for going to paris and not visiting chanel's apartment! what is wrong with me?

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  3. She was an inspiration for us all, I love this post, thanks for sharing with us about coco chanel :)) xoxo

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  4. Wow! That was such a nice short (and long) bio on Chanel. Thanks for sharing babe (though I will probably read it again tomorrow when I'm not so exhausted)

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  5. love these photos! she is so inspiring


    Anna Katrina
    http://passportglamour.blogspot.com

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  6. i love her flapper dresses the best!

    just stumbled upon your blog and i have to say its LOVELY. do drop by mine too when you have some time. perhaps we can follow each other. =)

    Persis.
    http://onestylemile.blogspot.com/

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  7. Great post - she was such a legend! I LOVED the coco before chanel movie :)

    xoxo
    www.missmollyfashions.blogspot.com

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  8. love her, the movie, this post!!!!!

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